Mexican and Muffins . . .

After a relaxing morning of coffee and muffins, Jan and I just enjoyed the brief burst of sunny weather we woke up to today, because tomorrow we’re back to rain and more wind. Wheeee!

After lunch I headed back over to the RV/MH Hall of Fame to work on their computer system some more. And by the time I left about 4:30 I was finally starting to get a handle on the things that still need to be done..

After getting home we all headed over to El Maguey for a great Mexican meal and a lot of good conversation, getting back to the rig in time for our favorite Monday night TV programs.

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And now for another installment of . . .

Things Every RV’er should have:

As a follow-up to yesterday’s post about testing your power connections using an AC Receptacle Tester, todays post will tell you how to not only test your power, but protect your rig at the same time.

To do that you need one of these. a Progressive EMS (Electrical Management System).

They have permanently mounted units like this one,

EMS_LCHW50c-L

and portable, hang-on-the-pedestal models like this one.

EMS_PT50C-L

Available in both 30 and 50 amp models, these units monitor your incoming shore power three different ways.

First, after you plug into the pedestal and flip the breaker on, the unit cycles through a number of tests on the incoming power, including voltage, frequency, and all possible mis-connections, i.e. open ground, open neutral, etc., before it applies power to the coach.

Second, it monitors the power all the time to be sure that the voltage levels stay over 104 volts, and under 132 volts. Voltage levels outside this range can damage your rig and your appliances.

Third, it acts as a surge suppressor to protect your rig from voltage surges and nearby lightning strikes, just the surge suppressor power strips you plug your computers and other electronics into.

I bought my Progressive EMS from Daryl Lawrence of Lawrence RV Accessories at Nick Russell’s Gypsy Journal Rally in Casa Grande, AZ, a month after we started our full-timing life. And in the last four years I’ve lost track of the times that the unit alerted me to problems with the power at the pedestal.

Once, on Cape Cod in 2009 the EMS gave its life in a shower of sparks to protect our rig from over 400 volts. And even though it was a weekend, Progressive overnighted me a new board to get my EMS going again. Now that’s service!

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Thought for the Day:

Pournelle’s Iron Law of Bureaucracy is that in any bureaucracy, the people devoted to the benefit of the bureaucracy itself always get in control, so that those dedicated to the goals the bureaucracy is supposed to accomplish have less and less influence, and sometimes are eliminated entirely.

gsdfgsgf

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4 Responses

  1. I agree with the Electrical Management System (EMS). . .we don’t have that particular brand, but have never plugged our rig in without one, and we encourage everyone who asks, after seeing our portable one hanging on the electrical pedestal, to practice the same preventative measures. . .great daily tips!

    Janice
    ReadyToGoFullTimeRVing.com

  2. Thanks for your comment.

    We appreciate you reading our blog.

    Greg and Jan White

  3. We bought an EMS from Daryl at the Elkhart rally last year and am very impressed with not only the unit but the service after the sale. We had some electrical problems last week and at first I thought the EMS had failed so I called Progressive and talked with a tech and explained the problem and he gave me to the owner of the company (don’t remember his name) and he really went out of his way to help us. It turned out to be a problem with our coach, not the EMS, but I was very impressed with his willingness to help with our problem.

  4. I have always gotten great service from both Daryl and Progressive. They’re good people.

    I also own the TireTraker Tire Pressure Monitoring System that Daryl also sells and it’s been great too.

    Thanks for reading our blog.

    Greg and Jan

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